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Oil 36

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28,90 €

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Quantity: 100ml

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Certificate of Analysis

1. Introduction

Apricot tree is the member of the rose family originating from Central and East Asia. The fruit, rich in vitamins is used to produce the pleasant smelling Apricot Kernel Oil. Sought out for its high vitamin E content and skin softening properties, apricot kernel oil is known for its ability to penetrate the skin without leaving an oily feel. Apricot kernel oil is also popular as massage oil and it used as carrier oil when used with essential oils for aromatherapy.

Rich in essential fatty acids like oleic and linoleic acid, apricot kernel oil is high in vitamin A. Since it easily penetrates the skin, it is good oil for prematurely aged, dry or irritated skin. The excellent softening and moisturizing properties is great for face, hands and hair. Vitamins A & C are good for mature dry or sensitive skin. The apricot kernel oil helps skin retain elasticity, clarity, and suppleness. In addition, Apricot Kernel Oil is used as an antitussive, anti-asthmatic and to treat tumors in traditional Chinese medicine.

2. Chemical components of Apricot Kernel Oil

Fatty acid, triacylglycerol, phytosterol, and tocopherol variations in kernel oil of Malatya apricots from Turkey

The fatty acid, sn-2 fatty acid, triacyglycerol (TAG), tocopherol, and phytosterol compositions of kernel oils obtained from nine apricot varieties grown in the Malatya region of Turkey were determined ( P<0.05). The names of the apricot varieties were Alyanak (ALY), Cataloglu (CAT), Cöloglu (COL), Hacihaliloglu (HAC), Hacikiz (HKI), Hasanbey (HSB), Kabaasi (KAB), Soganci (SOG), and Tokaloglu (TOK). The total oil contents of apricot kernels ranged from 40.23 to 53.19%. Oleic acid contributed 70.83% to the total fatty acids, followed by linoleic (21.96%), palmitic (4.92%), and stearic (1.21%) acids. The s n-2 position is mainly occupied with oleic acid (63.54%), linoleic acid (35.0%), and palmitic acid (0.96%). Eight TAG species were identified: LLL, OLL, PLL, OOL+POL, OOO+POO, and SOO (where P, palmitoyl; S, stearoyl; O, oleoyl; and L, linoleoyl), among which mainly OOO+POO contributed to 48.64% of the total, followed by OOL+POL at 32.63% and OLL at 14.33%. Four tocopherol and six phytosterol isomers were identified and quantified; among these, gamma-tocopherol (475.11 mg/kg of oil) and beta-sitosterol (273.67 mg/100 g of oil) were predominant. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the data from lipid components of apricot kernel oil in order to explore the distribution of the apricot variety according to their kernel's lipid components. PCA separated some varieties including ALY, COL, KAB, CAT, SOG, and HSB in one group and varieties TOK, HAC, and HKI in another group based on their lipid components of apricot kernel oil. So, in the present study, PCA was found to be a powerful tool for classification of the samples.

3. Clinical studies

Triterpenes augment the inhibitory effects of anticancer drugs on growth of human esophageal carcinoma cells in vitro and suppress experimental metastasis in vivo

The antineoplastic effects of combinations of anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and cisplatin) and triterpenes (ursolic acid, betulinic acid, oleanolic acid and a Japanese apricot extract (JAE) containing triterpenes) on esophageal squamous carcinoma cells were examined by the WST-8 (2-(2-methoxy- 4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, monosodium salt) assay in vitro and by an animal model in vivo. Triterpenes and JAE showed additive and synergistic cytotoxic effects, respectively, on esophageal squamous carcinoma cells (YES-2 cells) by combinational use of 5-fluorouracil. JAE and 5-fluorouracil induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and at S phase, respectively, and caused apoptosis in YES-2 cells. A new animal model of esophageal cancer causing tumor colonization of the peritoneal cavity and producing bloody ascites was made by injecting YES-2 cells into the peritoneal cavity of a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse. In this model, 5-fluorouracil inhibited colonization of tumor cells in the peritoneum. The addition of JAE to 5-fluorouracil augmented the suppression of experimental metastasis of the peritoneum. The numbers of peritoneal nodules of more than 2 mm in diameter in mice treated with 5-fluorouracil and JAE were less than those in mice treated with 5-fluorouracil alone or JAE alone. These results suggest that triterpenes, especially JAE, are effective supplements for enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect of 5-fluorouracil on esophageal cancer.

A novel anti-cancer substance, MK615, from ume, a variety of Japanese apricot, inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by suppressing Aurora A kinase activity

MK615 is an anti-cancer substance extracted from the Japanese apricot. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic effect of MK615 against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was evaluated in vitro, and its mechanism was elucidated. Two HCC lines, HuH7 and Hep3B, were cultured with MK615 at concentrations of 600, 300, 150, and 0 microg/mL. Growth inhibition was evaluated by MTT assay, and killing activity was determined by LDH assay. Cell cycle stages were evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of Aurora A kinase (Aurora A) was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting, and inhibition of Aurora A activity was determined by HTscan. MK615 inhibited the growth of, and lysed, HuH7 and Hep3B cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that MK615 increased the population of cells in G2/M phase. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that MK615 suppressed the expression of Aurora A. HTscan assay demonstrated that Aurora A activity was specifically inhibited by 34.3%, 32.9%, and 54.3% at 150, 300, and 600 microg/mL MK615, respectively. MK615 has an anti-cancer effect against HCC lines in vitro, and the effect is exerted through inhibition of Aurora A activity.

4. References

J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Dec 26;55(26):10787-94. Epub 2007 Nov 27. Fatty acid, triacylglycerol, phytosterol, and tocopherol variations in kernel oil of Malatya apricots from Turkey. Turan S, Topcu A, Karabulut I, Vural H, Hayaloglu AA. Food Engineering Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey.

Int J Cancer. 2009 Aug 15;125(4):952-60. Triterpenes augment the inhibitory effects of anticancer drugs on growth of human esophageal carcinoma cells in vitro and suppress experimental metastasis in vivo. Yamai H, Sawada N, Yoshida T, Seike J, Takizawa H, Kenzaki K, Miyoshi T, Kondo K, Bando Y, Ohnishi Y, Tangoku A. Department of Thoracic, Endocrine Surgery and Oncology, Institute of Health Bioscience, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan.

Hepatogastroenterology. 2007 Sep;54(78):1770-4. A novel anti-cancer substance, MK615, from ume, a variety of Japanese apricot, inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by suppressing Aurora A kinase activity. Okada T, Sawada T, Osawa T, Adachi M, Kubota K. Second Department of Surgery, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi, Japan.